Churches and Museums


Riverside ChurchChurches

Museums

  • Brooklyn Navy Yard Center at Bldg 92
    • The mission of the Brooklyn Navy Yard Center at BLDG 92 is to celebrate the Navy Yard’s past, present and future, and to promote the role the Yard and its tenants play as an engine for job creation and sustainable urban industrial growth. By providing access to exhibits, public tours, educational programs, archival resources and workforce development services, BLDG 92 reinforces the Yard’s unique bonds with the community and inspires future generations to become industrial innovators and entrepreneurs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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BAYONNE, N.J. (May 28, 2007) – Decommissioned aircraft carrier Intrepid (CV 11) sits at Bayonne Dry Dock and Repair Corp. to have her hull water blasted, primed and repainted. Intrepid is scheduled to return to a brand-new, Pier 86 on Manhattan’s west side in the fall of 2008. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kenneth R. Hendrix (RELEASED). Photo Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_Jersey#mediaviewer/File:US_Navy_070528-N-5758H-068_Decommissioned_aircraft_carrier_Intrepid_%28CV_11%29_sits_at_Bayonne_Dry_Dock_and_Repair_Corp._to_have_her_hull_water_blasted,_primed_and_repainted.jpg

 

  • National Lighthouse Museum
  • Sherman Zwicker (Grand Banks)
    • Launched in 1942 in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, the F/V Sherman Zwicker is the last original, saltbank fishing vessel in existence.  The Sherman Zwicker became a fully operational, traveling museum, attending many tall ship festivities along the eastern seaboard, and frequently visiting her old ports of call in Nova Scotia and Newfoundland to much fanfare. In 2014, the Grand Banks Schooner Museum Trust gifted the Sherman Zwicker to the Maritime Foundation to ensure her preservation for future generations.
  • Tanker Mary A. Whalen
    • The Mary A. Whalen is NYC’s favorite oil tanker, and our TankerTours are a vivid way to learn about energy sustainability issues, fuel distribution and consumption from the 1930’s to now.  TankerTours explain how this port is the largest petroleum through port in the country, and how this port supplies the whole northeast.
    • Mariners today benefit from a legal case “United States v. Reliable Transfer Co” involving the the Mary A. Whalen.  She went aground on the Rockaways, here in New York, on Christmas Day 1968.   A Coast Guard light was out and the Whalen’s owners blamed the Coast Guard.  The case went to the Supreme Court, which split the blame between both parties and – for the good of all of us – ruled in 1975 that in the cases of marine accidents, damages should be apportioned according to blame.  Sounds logical, but prior to this lawsuit, damages were split 50/50 regardless, and those at fault could shirk the financial consequences of their actions.
  • Tug Pegasus
    • To restore and preserve the 1907-built Tug Pegasus, a maritime icon whose very existence tells an important story about the history of the Port of New York/New Jersey.
    • To interpret the world around the Tug Pegasus, by bringing the public out into the waterways of the Port. Our visiting naturalists, historians, and marine industry personnel teach visitors about the harbor’s value as a rich natural habitat, as a historic waterway that shaped this city’s history, and as a thriving commercial port crucial to today’s economy.
  • Waterfront Museum
    • The Waterfront Museum, founded in 1985, is located in Red Hook, Brooklyn. It is housed aboard the 1914 Lehigh Valley Barge #79, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Its mission is to:
      • provide free and low-cost opportunities for education, exhibition, and the performance arts;
      • promote historic preservation and our maritime heritage and an understanding of the importance of our water highway for commerce, carrying commuters, culture, and recreation;
      • provide public access to waterfront piers, their unparalleled vistas and recreational opportunities;
      • be an active voice for public waterfront access issues up and down the river.
      • Source:  http://waterfrontmuseum.org
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