Battery Park City (including historic pier information)

Battery Park City – Map

http://www.batteryparkcity.org/page/index_battery.html

Battery Park City is a 92-acre (0.4 km²) planned community at the southwestern tip of lower Manhattan in New York City, United States. The land upon which it stands was created on the Hudson River using 1.2 million cubic yards (917,000 m3) of soil and rocks excavated during the construction of the World Trade Center and certain other construction projects, as well as from sand dredged from New York Harbor off Staten Island.  The neighborhood, which is the site of the World Financial Center along with numerous housing, commercial and retail buildings, is named for adjacent Battery Park.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battery_Park_City

 

 

Piers 1 – 23 existed prior to the creation of Battery Park City, created with the construction of the original World Trade Center.

 

This historic map shows the original location of the piers that existed prior to Battery Park. Photo source: http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/pierstations.html

The 1943 map above can be also viewed by clicking here:  New York Harbor Terminals.

1859: Ships moored in New York Harbour, seen from Trinity Church looking towards New Jersey. Built in 1846, Trinity Church was until the turn of the century the tallest structure in Manhattan. (Photo by William England/London Stereoscopic Company/Getty Images). Photo Source: http://www.gettyimagesgallery.com/Images/Thumbnails/1280/128007.jpg

This picture, courtesy of George Tamaro, an engineer who worked on the original WTC construction,depicts construction of the original World Trade Center One, taken in the early 1970s. The sand colored building is the New York Telephone building (today, the Verizon Building) (originally known as the Barclay-Vesey Building, when it opened in 1927), on the north side of Vesey Street. The piers existing prior to the creation of Battery Park are on the leftmost side of the picture.

Pier 22 and Pier 23

  • Piers 22 and 23 would be where Battery Park City is today, and were freight piers for the Baltimore & Ohio railroad.

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad – Harrison Street Freight Station / Pier 23 & Jay Street Freight Station / Pier 22- unknown date Erie RR Pier 21 / Duane Street facade showing in background above Pier 22 roof. G. Hockaday photographer L. Kilian collection authors collection.
Photo source: http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/pierstations.html#21%20Hudson

Pier 21

  • Pier 21 would have been where Battery Park City is today (at Duane Street), was operated by the Eric Railroad.

Erie Railroad – Duane Street Freight Station / Pier 21 – August 31, 1926. Photo source: http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/errpier21.jpg

Erie Railroad – Duane Street Freight Station / Pier 21 – July 12, 1931. Photo source: http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/errpier21c.jpg

Erie Railroad – Duane Street Freight Station / Pier 21 – July 8, 1937 (with Baltimore & Ohio Jay Street / Pier 22 in background) P. L. Sperr photo NYPL Digital Archives. Photo source: members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/pierstations.html#Pier 41

 

Pier 20

  • Pier 20 would have been where Battery Park City is today (at Chambers  Street), was operated by the Eric Railroad.

Circa 1906, the Erie Railroad Chambers Street Ferry Terminal, north end of Chambers Street at Hudson River, New York City. Photo Source: http://historyz.com/ebay9/118927w.jpg

There were of course other pier structures running down the Hudson shoreline, many of them quite imposing such as this one at Pier 20 and 21 for the Erie Railroad Company at the foot of Chambers Street, picture taken in 1930. Photo and caption source:  http://www.boweryboyshistory.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/pier.jpg

Erie Railroad – Chambers Street Freight Station / Pier 20 – 1942 Homer H. Poss, Jr. photo (Mr. Poss was sightseeing in New York City prior to disembarkation for overseas duty during when he took this image. His daughter, Sherry Fletcher; contacted me and presented this image (along with a photo of the DL&W Ferry “Ithaca”) as gifts. authors collection.
Photo source: http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/pierstations.html#20%20Hudson

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad – Duane Street Freight Station / Pier 21 (left) and Pier 20 (right) – ca. 1950. Photo source: http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/bopier2021.jpg

 

Pier 17

Pier 16

  • Pier 16 would be where Battery Park City is today (at Barclay Street).  It was part of the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad.
  • Note that later pictures show the Lackawanna-Erie Ferry terminal at Barclay Street.  I have not substantiated it, but the ferry pictures, below, would have to have been Pier 16.

New York Central & Hudson River Railroad – Barclay Street Freight Station / Pier 16 – pre 1900 image courtesy of Joseph De May, Kew Gardens, NY.
Photo source: http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/pierstations.html#16

New York Central Railroad – Barclay Street Freight Station / Pier 16 – ca. 1915 Joint Report with Recommendations of the New York & New Jersey Port & Harbor Development Commission.
Photo Source: http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/pierstations.html#16

The Erie-Lackawanna Ferryboat LACKAWANNA (1891) leaves Barclay Street on July 31, 1964. She was dieselized in 1949 and in the last years of service, the only non-coal burner in the fleet. She would make the final passenger sailing at 5:30pm on November 22, 1967 from Barclay Street to Hoboken.
Photo Source: http://worldshipny.com/elferry.shtml

The Erie-Lackawanna Ferry Terminal at Barclay & West Streets, Lower Manhattan, dates from 1884. Ferries left from here to the E-L Terminal in Hoboken, New Jersey. Note the Railway Express truck to the right. (Sept. 1964).
Photo Source: http://worldshipny.com/elferry.shtml

Lackawanna-Erie Ferry Terminal, Barclay Street Photographer: Bernice Abbott Photo Source: http://thinkingform.com/2011/07/17/4673

Pier 14

Pier 14 – Fall River Line (circa 1927)
Photo Source: http://fineprintnyc.blogspot.com/2013/01/evolution-of-new-york-city-part-7-1925.html The background includes, left, the New York Telephone building (today, the Verizon Building) (originally known as the Barclay-Vesey Building, when it opened in 1927), to the right, the Woolworth Building.

 

Pier 14 (Fulton and West Streets)
Photo: 1938 Berenice Abbott
Photo Source: http://ephemeralnewyork.wordpress.com/2011/08/08/the-fall-river-line-pier-fulton-and-west-streets

Pier 13

  • The Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Freight Station located on Pier 13 (Hudson River) was located at the foot of Cortlandt Street.   This Freight Station would share space with the Starin Transportation, Ben Franklin and New Haven shipping lines.

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight Station / Pier 13 – July 22, 1931 (looking northeast) P. L. Sperr photo NYPL Digital Archives.
Photo source: http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco. Behind Pier 13, the building is the New York Telephone building (today, the Verizon Building) (originally known as the Barclay-Vesey Building, when it opened in 1927).

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight Station / Pier 13 – August 1, 1933 (note marching troop formation on right edge of photo) P. L. Sperr photo NYPL Digital Archives.
Photo Source: http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/pierstations.html#Pier%2011

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight Station / Pier 13 – April 9, 1936 B. Abbott photo NYPL Digital Archives.
Photo source: http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/pierstations.html#Pier%2011

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight Station / Pier 13 – August 1, 1930 (looking southeast) P. L. Sperr photo NYPL Digital Archives.
Photo source: http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/pierstations.html#Pier%2011

Pier 13, Circa 1930s. Note – just east of Pier 13 are the Hudson Terminal Buildings. Photo source: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=34300&page=108

 

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight Station / Pier 13 , foreground left. Pier 14 – Fall River Line, foreground, right. Pennsylvania Railroad, Exchange Place terminal, Jersey City, New Jersey, background. Photo source: http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e390/MikeMacDonald/PRRJersey.jpg

The source caption for this photo is, “(Charles W.) Cushman took this from on board a ferry that was approaching Liberty Street in September 1941.” While the Central Railroad of New Jersey ferry terminal, to the right, is well identified (see “Pier 12,” below, a pier at LIberty Street, I cannot identify a Pennsylvania Railroad Pier and ferry terminal, adjacent to CRRNJ. And the Pier 13 photos note that the pier was a Lackawanna Railroad pier. I am not sure when the PRR built the pier adjacent to the CRRNJ Liberty Street pier. Note, behind the PRR pier are the Hudson Terminal buildings. http://static2.businessinsider.com/image/4e1b372dcadcbb5007150000-1200/cushman-took-this-from-onboard-a-ferry-that-was-approaching-liberty-street-in-september-1941.jpg

Pier 12

Circa 1930s, Ferry, Central Railroad of New Jersey, Foot of Liberty Street, Manhattan. Photo Source: http://images.nypl.org/index.php?id=482838&t=w

The building on the far right is 90 West Street aka the “West Street Building”, which still stands, although severely damaged in the September 11, 2001 attacks when the south tower of the World Trade Center collapsed directly across the street. It was designed by architect Cass Gilbert who went on to design the Woolworth Building, which is on the far left of this photo. Originally built as an office building, the main tenant of 90 West St. was the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad. The building directly above the archway labeled “CR” with the domed roof is the Singer Sewing Machine Building, and the World Trade Centers later stood in front that location. The two “twin” buildings, just left to the middle of the picture, behind the piers, are the Hudson Terminal Buildings above the ferry slips. Photo source: http://tcaetrain.org/articles/chronicles/groundzero/WTC_07.jpg

Note the ferry terminals to the right of the CRRNJ Liberty Street ferry terminal, which has no name. See, above, the last photo in the “Pier 13” section. Photo source: http://tcaetrain.org/articles/chronicles/groundzero/WTC_09.jpg

View showing the front of the CRRNJ marine terminal on Liberty and West Streets; and in the lower left hand corner, the now razed Westside Highway Photo Source: http://tcaetrain.org/articles/chronicles/groundzero/WTC_10.jpg

Central of New Jersey’s ferryboat ELIZABETH (1904) leaves Liberty Street, Manhattan for Jersey City where passengers connect to CNJ, B&O and Reading Railroad trains. Note the Hudson Terminal Building above the ferry slips and the Woolworth Building to the left and the Singer Tower to the extreme right, the latter soon to be demolished along with the Hudson Terminal, to make way for the World Trade Center towers. (April 18, 1967). Photo source: http://www.worldshipny.com/images/cnj1eliz.jpg

Pier 11

Central Railroad of New Jersey – Cedar Street Freight Station / Pier 11 – ca. 1932 E. Galloway photo NYPL Digital Archives.
Photo source: http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/pierstations.html#Pier%2011

Pier 10 

Pier 8

Lehigh Valley Railroad – Rector Street Freight Station / Pier 8 – September 20, 1929 P. L. Sperr photo NYPL Digital Archives.
Photo source: http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/pierstations.html#Pier%208

Lehigh Valley Railroad – Rector Street Freight Station / Pier 8 – October 5, 1938 P. L. Sperr photo NYPL Digital Archives.
Photo source: http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/pierstations.html#Pier%208

Piers 3, 4, 5

Pier 1

Pennsylvania Railroad Pier 1 / Battery Place Freight Station – Battery Place – ca. 1902 (from an Underwood & Underwood stereoscopic photo) image courtesy of Joseph De May, Kew Gardens, NY.
Photo source: http://members.trainweb.com/bedt/indloco/pierstations.html#Pier%201

Pier A

Department of Docks and Police Station, Pier A, North River, Manhattan.. Abbott, Berenice — Photographer. May 05, 1936.
Photo Source: Changing New York / Berenice Abbott. (more info). Repository: The New York Public Library. Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.

Circa 1880, Aerial view illustration of the tip of Manhattan in New York City, featuring Castle Garden in Battery Park and docks on the rivers. Brooklyn Bridge under construction is shown in exaggerated scale. Photo source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castle_Clinton#mediaviewer/File:Castle_Garden_aerial_view_ca1880.jpg

Towing USS Lafayette with view of Hudson River piers, 1945. Amid increasing European hostilities, France’s Normandie sought refuge in New York at Pier 88. In 1941, the Navy assumed the ship, and changed its name to the USS Lafayette. On the February 9, 1942, a fire broke out and the ship capsized. Although salvaged at great expense, restoration was deemed too costly and she was scrapped in October 1946.
The pier with the twin peaks is Pier 13 (at Fulton Street).
(Credit: U.S. Navy via the New-York Historical Society).
Photo Source: http://www.warhistoryonline.com/war-articles/remembering-new-york-city-during-world-war-ii-in-photos.html

Aerial view of New York City, looking north, on December 16, 1951. (source: NYC Municipal Archives). Photo source: http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/infocus/nycm042712/e_s_n02_dma01739.jpg

The U.S. Navy aircraft carrier USS Saratoga (CVA-60) departs after a port call in New York City, 1956-1959.
Source: U.S. Navy National Museum of Naval Aviation photo No. 2008.122.011
Photo Source: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:USS_Saratoga_CVA-60_leaving_NYC_1950s.jpg

  • Skyscrapers of New York City, from the North River, May 10, 1903 (Video, below)

    • Thomas A. Edison took this footage on May 20, 1903.
    • Filmed from a moving boat, the film depicts the Hudson River (i.e., North River) shoreline and the piers of lower Manhattan beginning around Fulton Street and extending to Castle Garden and Battery Park. It begins at one of the American Line piers (Pier 14 or 15, opposite Fulton Street) where an American Line steamer, either the “New York” or “Paris,” is seen docked. The camera passes one of the Manhattan-to-New Jersey commuter ferries to Jersey City or Communipaw [0860]. Proceeding south, the distinct double towers of the Park Row, or Syndicate Building, erected in 1897-98, can be seen in the background. A coastal freighter is next, then Trinity Church appears, to the left of which can be seen the Surety Building, as a tug with a “C” on the stack passes in foreground. Several small steamboats come into view, and the B.T. Babbitt Soap factory at Pier 6 is seen, followed by the Pennsylvania Railroad piers (#5 & #4), with a group of docked railroad car floats [2556], and the Lehigh Valley Railroad piers (#3 & #2), also with car floats. Next are the Bowling Green Building (rectangular, with facade to camera), the Whitehall Building (vertical, thin side to camera), followed by Pennsylvania Railroad Pier #1. Pier A (with a clock tower) is seen with the New York Harbor Police steam boat “Patrol” at its end. The Bowling Green Offices and the Produce Exchange at Bowling Green are visible in the background. The breakwater (sheltered landing) and the New York City Fireboat House appears and the distinctive round structure, Castle Garden, once a fort and immigrant station, but at the time of filming the City Aquarium, comes into view. The camera then pans east along the Battery Park promenade: the Barge Office (with tower) is visible in the distance, and further out the Brooklyn shoreline with the grain elevators at Atlantic Avenue can be seen. This view is continued, with only a minor break in continuity, in the film Panorama of Sky Scrapers and Brooklyn Bridge From the East River. Together they comprise a sweep around the southern tip of Manhattan, from Fulton Street on the Hudson to the Brooklyn Bridge.(Video courtesy of Thomas A. Edison, Inc./Library of Congress/Tehrkot Media)
    • Source:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mVAhUAjN0rE

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